Posts

The movie “Railway Man” is a powerful and moving story about a World War II prisoner of war who confronts and ultimately forgives the man who tortured him. Much of the movie was very hard to watch but the ending was worth it.

Do you find yourself drawn to stories or experiences that tap into your emotions or do you tend to avoid them? Compartmentalizing our feelings can help create a sense of control and maintain our sanity. Our challenge is opening up those compartments and dealing with the anger, grief or whatever we locked away. Movies, books, art, music, and nature can be safe ways to release those feelings. If we go through life as a cardboard cutout with no emotions, something might escape when we least expect it.

I invite you to find a healthy emotional outlet this week and share your story with someone…

loss

What is My Role?

Recently, I have been very aware of the impact of loss on family members, clients and friends who have lost loved ones or learned of a terminal illness.  While I knew this was an inevitable part of life, I struggled to understand my role in these situations.  In some cases, it was to provide comfort in a very personal way.  In others, it was to offer a prayer that comfort would be provided by someone else.

 

Five Stages of Grief

Have you wondered how to help a friend or colleague who has suffered a loss and is dealing with profound sadness, confusion and fear of what lies ahead? You may be familiar with the five stages of grief as defined by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross and David Kessler:

  • Denial
  • Anger
  • Bargaining
  • Depression
  • Acceptance

They point out that not everyone goes through all five stages and may not experience them in this order, but it can be useful to have some idea of what to expect.  The website grief.com has good suggestions for what to say and do.

 

It’s Not About Me

One thing I have learned is that focusing on the other person rather than myself helps us both.  I invite you to keep that in mind when someone you know is grieving.